#EpiC_Friday_Shares no.1

I have been finding myself bookmarking a lot of papers and websites lately, thinking “Oh, I need to share these with my EpiC followers”…that’s how the idea of #EpiC_Friday_Shares came to life!

One post every Friday highlighting some of the cool stuff I came across during the week. Some animal health related, of course, others maybe more random… I hope you discover something new!

Animal health

Animal health
Picture taken during graffiti event at Snösätragränd
  • AHDB Pork launched this week a “hazard perception” video app to help pig producers better identify weaknesses in biosecurity. It is easy to overlook factors such as the movement of visitors and vehicles which may affect the health of your stock. The series of interactive video scenarios demonstrating both best practice and common mistakes makes a valuable tool in my opinion. More info here.

 

  • An interesting article from All About Feed summarises the results of recent insect meal trials for aquaculture and livestock. Find it here.

 

  • Authors of this paper incorporated ecosystem and location of isolation into a comparative genetic analysis of avian influenza A virus (AIV) in poultry. While interactions between migratory birds and animal productions systems contribute to the emergence of AIV, poultry trade may play a major role in spreading viral populations.

Other topics

Other topics
Picture taken during graffiti event at Snösätragränd
  • Searching for Signs of Hannibal’s Route in DNA from Horse Manure. A paper recently published in Archaeometry suggests that analyses of cores taken from the Col de la Traversette, a ten-thousand-foot pass, revealed genetic fragments from bacteria commonly found in horse manure. Dating churned soil precisely is proving difficult but the range of dates for this sample overlaps with Hannibal’s travels. The New Yorker ran a story on this.

 

  • I had no idea this was going on until this Nature article revealed the end of a 9 years censorship for government scientists in Canada. When you think of governments controlling communications, many names come to mind before Canada crops up. The policy followed the administration’s loosening of environmental regulations (to increase extraction of natural resources)…and the government did not want their scientists to be vocal about the potential impacts of such changes. Found this fascinating story here.

 

  •  A newly developed software SpiroCall allows the measurement of lung function over the phone, with an error rate similar to professional spirometers. Great potential for the diagnosis of people with lung diseases in developing nations. Find news item here and original paper here.

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